How Do You Prevent Synecdoche?

What is the purpose of a synecdoche?

Synecdoche is used to sound more colloquial and to mirror everyday language.

This helps a speaker connect with his audience to achieve his purpose..

Is lend me your ears synecdoche or metonymy?

Synecdoche is a figure of speech where a part of something is used for the whole or vice versa. Therefore lend me your ears is a synecdoche because in lending the ears the person is using part of the body to give the person making the statement his/her full attention.

Is an example of synecdoche from the poem?

For example, someone might refer to her car as her “wheels,” or a teacher might ask his class to put their eyes on him as he explains something. When poets use synecdoche, they are often deploying it for a very specific purpose related to the overall meaning of the poem itself.

How can I remember metonymy?

An easy way to remember metonymy is that the prefix ‘meto-‘ means change, and the suffix ‘-onymy’ means a name/word or set of names/words. In simpler words, you could say that Metonymy is ‘using a single feature to represent the whole’.

What figure of speech is synecdoche?

Synecdoche is a rhetorical trope and a type of figurative speech similar to metonymy—a figure of speech that uses a term that denotes one thing to refer to a related thing. Indeed, synecdoche is considered by some a type of metonymy.

What is an example of Epistrophe?

The repetition of words in Lincoln’s address and Cobain’s song are examples of a literary device called “epistrophe.” Derived from the ancient Greek word meaning “turning back upon,” epistrophe is the repetition of phrases or words in a set of clauses, sentences, or poetic lines.

Is synecdoche a type of irony?

Synecdoche is different to both Irony and Metaphor, but it is just as concrete in its implications. It represents a trope where a ‘part’ is substituted for a ‘whole’. … This is different from synecdoche, where the two elements being summoned must be part of the same whole.

What is an example of metonymy?

Metonymy is the use of a linked term to stand in for an object or concept. … Sometimes metonymy is chosen because it’s a well-known characteristic of the concept. A famous example is, “The pen is mightier than the sword,” from Edward Bulwer Lytton’s play Richelieu.

How do you make a synecdoche?

In order to write a synecdoche,Examine a sentence for objects or ideas which have parts or are part of a whole.Replace a part with a whole or a whole with a part.

What is synecdoche in poetry?

Glossary of Poetic Terms A figure of speech in which a part of something stands for the whole (for example, “I’ve got wheels” for “I have a car,” or a description of a worker as a “hired hand”). It is related to metonymy. Poetry Magazine.

How do you use synecdoche in a sentence?

If you said “check out my new wheels,” “wheels” is an example of synecdoche, used to refer to a “car.” A part of a car, in this example, represents the whole of the car. Figurative language comes in many shapes and sizes. As well as synecdoche, you have metaphors, similes, personification, and more.

What is the most common form of metonymy?

A common form of metonymy uses a place to stand in for an institution, industry, or person. “Wall Street” is an example of this, as is “the White House” to mean the President or Presidential administration of the United States, or “Hollywood” to mean the American film industry.

What does anaphora mean?

1 : repetition of a word or expression at the beginning of successive phrases, clauses, sentences, or verses especially for rhetorical or poetic effect Lincoln’s “we cannot dedicate—we cannot consecrate—we cannot hallow—this ground” is an example of anaphora — compare epistrophe.

What is a metonymy easy definition?

: a figure of speech consisting of the use of the name of one thing for that of another of which it is an attribute or with which it is associated (such as “crown” in “lands belonging to the crown”)

What is an example of a synecdoche?

Synecdoche is a figure of speech in which, most often, a part of something is used to refer to its whole. For example, “The captain commands one hundred sails” is a synecdoche that uses “sails” to refer to ships—ships being the thing of which a sail is a part.

Can a person be synecdoche?

Synecdoche is a figure of speech referring to when a part of something is used to refer to the whole, such as in the phrase “all hands on deck,” where “hands” are people.

How do you identify a synecdoche?

Synecdoche is a figure of speech in which a word or phrase that refers to a part of something is substituted to stand in for the whole, or vice versa. For example, the phrase “all hands on deck” is a demand for all of the crew to help, yet the word “hands”—just a part of the crew—stands in for the whole crew.

What is another word for synecdoche?

What is another word for synecdoche?figure of speechmetaphorcomparisontruismadumbrationallusionanaphoradevicehyperboleimage27 more rows

What effect does synecdoche have?

Synecdoches allow speakers to emphasize certain parts of a whole, highlighting their importance by substituting them for the whole. They also draw attention to the power of associative and referential thinking, as readers automatically understand that a part can stand for the whole and vice versa.

Is lend me your ears metonymy?

A familiar Shakespearean example is Mark Antony’s speech in Julius Caesar in which he asks of his audience: “Lend me your ears.” Metonymy is closely related to synecdoche, the naming of a part for the whole or a whole for the part, and is a common poetic device.

What is an example of a chiasmus?

Chiasmus is a figure of speech in which the grammar of one phrase is inverted in the following phrase, such that two key concepts from the original phrase reappear in the second phrase in inverted order. The sentence “She has all my love; my heart belongs to her,” is an example of chiasmus.